#60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume) Zoom

#60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume)

SKU:103-1

Brand: Amtrol

Amtrol
Qty Price
$62.89
/ each
$243.80 / box (4 units x $60.95)
In Stock! Ships in 24-48 Hours
(210 Available)
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Specs

Tank Volume: 7.6 Gallons
Warranty: 5-Year Limited Warranty
Diameter (Inches): 11"
Height: 23"
Max Accepted Volume: 2.5 Gallons
Application: Heating
Max Pressure (PSI): 100 psi
Thread Type: Male
Max Temp (F): 240°F
Precharged PSI: 12 psi
Thread Size: 1/2"

Description for Amtrol 103-1

Amtrol 60 EXTROL Expansion Tank, 7.6 Gallon

Features:

  • For use with closed hydronic heating and cooling systems
  • Factory pre-charged to 12 psig
  • Pre-charge should be adjusted to equal minimum operating pressure at tank location
  • Maximum working pressure: 100 psig
  • Maximum operating temperature: 240ºF

#60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume)

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Amtrol#60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume)
 
4.3

(based on 7 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Reviewed by 7 customers

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Displaying reviews 1-7

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4.0

Good and Reliable

By Pedros

from USA

Verified Buyer

Comments about #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume):

These Amtrol Tanks are good reliable units. I have had good luck with them.

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

I would buy again

By heavy

from central Mn

Verified Buyer

Comments about #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume):

Nice expansion tank at a good price

 
4.0

came in very good condition

By jus5us

from detroit

Verified Buyer

Comments about #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume):

I us this on 187,000 btu hot water system

 
5.0

Nice tank

By Sean A

from Sayreville, NJ

Verified Buyer

Comments about #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume):

Check the Amtrol site/documentation for proper sizing for your system. Comes pre charged and there is a cap on air valve to stop curious hands.

 
3.0

Simple to install

By John

from Portsmouth, VA

Verified Buyer

Comments about #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume):

I installed thid product on my boiler system and haven't seen a problem yet. I was slightly disappointed when I opened the box and discovered the connection fitting had been struck and therefore impacted the tank slightly. With a pair of pliers I was quickly able to fix the issue. Other than that very simple to install.

 
5.0

doing the Job

By Ron

from Martville, NY

Verified Buyer

Comments about #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume):

Easy to install, works great and does the job.[...]

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Handles the pressure

By Joe the HVAC tech

from Lakewood, NY

Verified Buyer

Comments about #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume):

I went through 3 smaller tanks based on the installing contractor till I realized he never sized the expansion tank for the system. This slightly larger tank seems to have made the difference for a slightly larger than normal residential system and fit in the existing system.

Displaying reviews 1-7

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Q&A: Ask the Questions, share answers

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5 Questions | 12 Answers
Displaying questions 1-5
  • #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume)

    Q:

    can the expansion tank be mounted with the feed side down?
    Asked on 8/21/2014 by stel from McAdoo,Pa.

    3 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes you can it will work the same either way!

      Answered on 8/21/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Shouldn't be a problem with bladder tanks.

      Answered on 8/21/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes you can, I have installed them Up down and sideways and they work fine.

      Answered on 8/21/2014 by Master Plumber Tom from New York
  • #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume)

    Q:

    Installed on my system is an extrol model 60. The blow-off valve constantly releases when the temperature is set to 68 degrees and then the pressure rises to about 30 psi. The pressure tank always seems either cold or a little warm. i replaced the pressure valve already, so i am assuming the tank is not working properly(the pressure is holding at 12psi.) should i replace with the same model or a larger one? do you think from my description my diagnosis is correct?
    Asked on 1/2/2014 by IBK from NJ from North Brunswick, NJ

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Try releasing a little air out of the tank and see if any water comes with it, if so, the bladder is compromised and you need a new tank. If not I am not sure what is causing you issue.

      Answered on 1/3/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Try releasing a little air out of the tank and see if any water comes with it, if so, the bladder is compromised and you need a new tank. If not I am not sure what is causing you issue.

      Answered on 1/3/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I am just a home owner and novice at hot water systems, I have a 103
      year old house with the original boiler and heating system that was
      converted from coal to natural gas in the 50's. I bought the Extrol Model
      60 because the holding expansion tank in the attic had developed a leak
      and could not be repaired. The tank in the attic was exposed to the
      atmosphere and would allow water to expand by filling up the tank witch was
      above the entire system thus sealing the operating part of the system from
      the oxygen. I needed a way to regulate the expansion in the system by not
      having to have a tank in the attic and protecting the water from the
      corrosive power of oxygen. Now a 103 years have passed and we now have
      expansion tanks that can be installed right next to the boiler instead of
      the highest point on the system.
      It is possible to have to small of a expansion tank on your system,
      depending on the water volume your system contains. I am assuming you have
      a low pressure sealed hot water system? It should operate fine around 5
      to 10lbs psi. The purpose of the tank is to absorb the expansion of the
      water as it heats up without exposing the water to oxygen, while not
      allowing the pressure to pop your blow off valve. Inside the tank is a
      rubber diaphragm that expands and allows water to fill inside the tank to
      equalize the pressure in the system. When the system cools down the water
      volume shrinks as does the rubber diaphragm pushing water back into the
      system.
      I am assuming that the valve stem you have pictured in the photo is
      the one on the bottom of the expansion tank, and NOT the pressure blow off
      valve that continually releases at 30 psi. The valve on the bottom of the
      tank is the other half of the expansion tank that holds air on the other
      side of the rubber diaphram, it comes from the factory with a pre- charged
      pressure. You can check the pressure of air in the tank with a tire
      pressure gauge. You can adjust the pressure in the tank by releasing the
      air or adding air with a bicycle pump. the purpose of the air pressure is
      to help the diaphragm regulate the pressure in the tank as different
      systems operate on different pressures. The air pressure in the tank could
      be so high that it is pushing to hard on the diaphragm and not allowing the
      water to expand into the tank, thus allowing the pressure to build up to
      high in the system. You can bleed off the air in the tank to equal the
      operating pressure of your system when the water is cold. As the system
      heats up you can watch the pressure gauge and bleed off the air little by
      little so it doesn't go to high above the operating pressure of your
      system. The same can happen if your volume of water in your system is so
      great that it expands so much it is filling the tank to full capacity and
      the pressure has no where to go. You would have to have a pretty huge
      house and system for this to happen with this size of tank. One way to
      check if the tank is too full of water is to tap on the tank lightly with
      you finger. The top of the tank should make a low thud sound meaning water
      is present, while the bottom should sound tinny and empty. As the water
      expands and heats up the thud sound should slowly creep down further toward
      the bottom of the tank. If your pressure valve is still blowing off and
      the tank sounds tinny, then water is not expanding in the tank, maybe a
      closed valve somewhere or a clogged pipe or to much air pressure in the
      bottom of the tank. If there is any water that leaks out of the valve on
      the bottom of the tank at any time, that means the diaphram is broken and
      the tank is completely shot. You need a new tank at this point. If only
      air comes out of the valve on the bottom the tank it is most likely fine.
      If water does not come out of the tank and it sounds full of water you can
      try pumping some air into the bottom of the tank and bleeding water out of
      the system to push the diaphragm up inside the tank giving some room for
      the water to expand, when the water is cold, less than a quarter of the top
      of the tank should contain water. Hope this helps, good luck.

      Answered on 1/2/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      There are a lot of variables involved.
      A couple things you didn't include are total system water volume and max
      system temp change.
      Glycol content too for expansion rate.
      Those factors dictate extrol tank size.
      IE: 100 liters of water expands by 1.28 liters going from 20 to 80C (from
      engineers toolbox)
      Aside from that, I'd test the tank bladder.
      Remove the tank and check the air pressure, if 0 try to add air, does it
      hold?
      Does the tank have water in it after being removed? - failed bladder.

      Answered on 1/2/2014 by Anonymous
  • #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume)

    Q:

    System is leaking at the top of the PRV check valve. What should I do to correct this?
    Asked on 9/25/2011 by Anonymous from Tomahawk, WI 54487

    1 answer

    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      We would recommend that you repair or replace the PRV.

      Answered on 9/27/2011 by PexSupply Staff from NY
  • #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume)

    Q:

    I have a no-name (no model, no brand, nothing label on the tank) expansion tank in my hydronic system. It is leaking out some bubbles in the steel in the top part of the tank so I assume it needs replaced. The boilers are cast iron but the in floor radiant is plastic tubing. The existing tank is about 11 inches in diameter and about 20 inches in length. Can I assume a replacement tank of similar dimensions will work?
    Asked on 5/2/2011 by Anonymous from Utah

    2 answers

    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      Please use our expansion tank sizing calculator at the link below for a good estimate.

      http://www.pexsupply.com/pex/control/ExpansionTankSizeCalculator

      Answered on 5/3/2011 by PexSupply Staff from NY
    • A:

      Yes! After all it is working so far. #60 is pretty big. You can always use a larger Exp tank, but not too small or you will push water out of the boiler relief valve. I would go with an RX tank unless you are sure that your PEX has an oxygen barrier on it. I think that you have non-barrier PEX cuz your tank is rustin' out. If it does have a barrier use a regular tank (Extrol). Does your tank have the fill valve on top of the Exp tank (like a Filtrol-110 or a separate press. regulation fill valve to set system pressure)? The RX doesn't have any system pressure regulation built in like a Filtrol , so you need a P.R.(fill) Valve set to 12-15 psi.with RX tank inflated the same psi. If PEX is non-barrier get a good mico-bubbler, like a Sparco and not an air scoop, air eliminator. Cuz oxygen gets into non-barrier PEX and rusts out the iron parts.

      Answered on 4/30/2012 by Homer from Nevada
  • #60 Extrol Expansion Tank (7.6 Gallon Volume)

    Q:

    I have had a #60 Extrol Expansion Tank in my system operating flawlessly for 3 years, until I noticed a bubble in the paint near the top, side, where the groove that is formed at the factory is located. I touched the bubble, and it's leaking!!! Is this the proper tank for a cast iron closed loop heating system? The system pressure maximum is 22 PSI (hot water, not steam)
    Asked on 4/16/2011 by Dave from Montague, Michigan

    2 answers

    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      Yes, this is the correct tank.

      Answered on 4/18/2011 by PexSupply Staff from NY
    • A:

      How old is the Exp tank? Less than 5 yrs? You have oxygen getting into your system. Is your system In-Floor? Is it PEX plastic tubing? See Utah's response above about PEX. Your pressure should be 12-15 psi for a two story house, 16-19 psi @ 180 degrees. If your tank is rusting out because of O2 getting into your system, your rusting out the iron pumps, flanges, and heat exchanger in the boiler, too.---I've found in life everything works flawlessly until it doesn't.

      Answered on 4/30/2012 by Homer from Nevada
Displaying questions 1-5

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