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6 Zone Switching Relay

SKU:SR506-4

Brand: Taco

Taco
Qty Price
$202.95
/ each
$389.70 / box (2 units x $194.85)
In Stock! Ships in 24-48 Hours
(10 Available)
4

Resources

Specs

Zones:
?
6
Width: 11-3/4"
Height: 7-1/2"
Depth (Inches): 3"
Amperage:
?
20
Application: Zoning
Power Method: 120 VAC Input
Voltage:
?
120 VAC

Description for Taco SR506-4

The Taco SR506-4 Switching Relay is the best choice for all your zoning needs, with advanced PowerPort Cards, external diagnostic lights, switchable priority and contractor friendly PC board layouts. Combined with the time proven reliability of the 00 family of circulators and thermostats, total system integrating is achieved. External indicator lights provide instant diagnostic feedback, making a snap of service calls or new installation start-ups.

  • 24-Volt power input or output terminal
  • Fuse protected
  • Simplified wiring
  • Compact design

6 Zone Switching Relay

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Taco2 Zone Switching Relay
 
4.8

(based on 68 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (57)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (11)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

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100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Reviewed by 68 customers

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5.0

Good product

By Frankie five aces

from boston ,ma

Verified Buyer

Comments about 4 Zone Switching Relay:

Easy to install

 
5.0

Works as advertised

By Tom

from Pagosa Springs, CO

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1 Zone Switching Relay:

Needed to control a Taco circulating pump for a small radiant floor system. I have 1 zone for heating the North facing roof for snow removal, and the other zone for heating the Master bathroom floor. I needed to control only the floor heat and this single zone relay works great.

 
5.0

Works as advertised

By hammondmike

from hammond, in

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1 Zone Switching Relay:

included bus jumper eliminates one wire, which makes for a neater wire bundle.

 
5.0

Taco-Almost as great as Supply House!

By Cuda

from Thornton, NH

Verified Buyer

Comments about 6 Zone Switching Relay:

Taco switching relays are easy to use and install. Very versatile and expandable. I am using one for the main heating loops and DHW, and a second to control a glycol based, slab radiant system. Up and running with no issues!

 
4.0

Improved version

By Jim

from Illinois

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1 Zone Switching Relay:

This is a redesigned SR501 relay. There are no small fuses. Overall it appears to be higher quality. I hope that it proves to be more reliable than TACO's older version. The older ones were problematic on the low voltage side. (They seemed to overheat).

 
5.0

switching relay

By Gary

from Central WI

Verified Buyer

Comments about 4 Zone Switching Relay:

i'm controling my boiler and 4 in floor heating zones easy hookup works efortlesly

(1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

It works great.

By JH

from Scarsdale, NY

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1 Zone Switching Relay:

Replace the old relay and more reliable.

 
5.0

relay (taco)

By marks49ford

from willow springs il.

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1 Zone Switching Relay:

was easy to hook up easy to use! shipping took along time. (3) days before they shipped...............

(1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Works great

By Bladeguy

from Wisonsin

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1 Zone Switching Relay:

The proper hookup for my system and thermostat were not included in the instructions, but once I used my meter to figure out how the relay worked, I got it up and running and it works great. I used a 519 One Stage thermostat and the instructions for that and the relay made no sense, so I had to figure it out on my own, but not that big of a problem to do so. Everything works great now.

 
5.0

I am perfectly satisfied with Pex

By Kenn

from superior, WI

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1 Zone Switching Relay:

I have been updating my 30 year old boiler and have relied on Pex for controllers, pumps and s soon to br purchasef exhaust fan snd other shelf items. I appreciate the quick turn-around on my order and the quality/price. I would highly recommend Pex Supply to anyone.

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46 Questions | 92 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • 6 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    which relay is priority for my indirect hot water tank ? sr506-4 . thanks, gary
    Asked on 6/9/2014 by gary

    2 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      the last zone, in your case zone 6 is the priority but there is a switch you must turn on so the priority is active top right side of circuit board

      Answered on 6/9/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Zone 6. See here
      <http://s3.supplyhouse.com/manuals/13***.****6/85287_PROD_FILE.pdfc> .

      Answered on 6/9/2014 by DonS from Oakland, CA
  • 6 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    Does this switching relay have a "primary" pump control? Im thinking of using a Primary/Secondary type system and I will need the Primary pump to start when ever one of the zones calls for heat.
    Asked on 4/14/2014 by Eric

    7 answers

    • A:

      On further re-consideration. Do this. Get a switching relay that covers all the pump zones+primary pump. Wire this way--connect all the thermostats and secondary pump to the switching relay. Connect the dry TT contacts to the thermostat connection of the primary pump zone. I assume you are not connecting the dry TT contacts to a boiler. If so forget this idea. The boiler has it's own transformer and the switching relay has it's own transformer. Connecting the two voltages together may put them in reverse polarity. Not good. When the thermostats call for heat the secondary pump and the primary pump will turn on together.

      Answered on 7/28/2014 by Homer from Nevada
    • A:

      To plainly answer your question, No! Can't be done. You need a single pump relay and a switching relay for the number of zones that you have. Connect the switching relay to the secondary pumps and the thermostats and the switching relay dry TT contacts to the primary single pump relay which will turn the primary pump on when the thermostats call for heat. Taco makes a pump that has a built in relay, I believe, eliminating the need for a single pump relay.

      Answered on 7/28/2014 by Homer from Nevada
    • A:

      Some people call the boiler loop the primary and some call it the secondary. I prefer to call it the primary because the heat originates from there. Why isn't the boiler turning on the primary pump? The relay just closes the dry TT contacts that turn on the boiler which turns on the primary pump. The switching relay turns on the secondary pumps when the thermostats call for heat. Be sure and connect the primary loop to the secondary loop thru closely spaced T's to hydrolicly separate the two loops. (Prevent pump interference in the two loops.) Primary and secondary looping is used with high resistant to flow boilers. High head boilers.

      Answered on 7/28/2014 by Homer from Nevada
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I am not sure it needs to have a primary pump relay. In a normal
      single-pump set-up, the thermostat gets wired into the boiler's control
      panel. When the thermostat calls for heat, the boiler closes the loop for
      the system pump, and water flows through the entire heating system.
      The way I set-up my system, I had three zone pumps on the secondary loop
      and a small circulator on the primary (boiler) side. The three zone pumps
      were wired into the switching relay, along with the respective zone
      thermostats. When a thermostat called for heat, it would signal the
      switching relay which does two things. 1) it closes the loop to the
      corresponding zone pump(s) and 2) it signals the boiler there is a call for
      heat, using the same wiring connection as the thermostat in a single zone
      system. So now when the switching relay signals to the boiler there is a
      call for heat (in lieu of the thermostat in a single-zone system), the
      boiler responds to the call for heat and powers the attached primary pump
      (which is the system pump in a single-zone system described above).
      Therefore, the primary-side pump is powered directly off the boiler's
      control panel and doesn't need a connection on the switching relay.
      I hope this makes sense and that it helped.

      Answered on 4/15/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      NO
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 4/15/2014 by Bob from Long Island
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Sort of.
      Whenever any of the zones calls for heat the boiler start signal at X-X will
      be closed. This signal is intended to start the boiler, if you're not using
      it for boiler control you can use it to start a primary pump. The X-X
      signal is a control signal, it is not rated for full power to the pump like
      the zone relay outputs. If you don't need all 6 zones then you can use one
      of the zone relays for your primary. Connect the X-X contacts to the
      thermostat input for the zone you want to use for your primary. Then,
      whenever any zone calls for heat X-X will close, which in turn will be seen
      as a call for heat on the primary zone. When the other zones clear the X-X
      will open (the circuit doesn't seal itself), causing the primary to shut
      down.
      If you don't have a spare zone you can do the same thing with an external
      primary pump relay (the SR501 or pretty much any other suitable relay).
      If you also want to use the X-X signal for the boiler then it gets more
      complicated.

      Answered on 4/14/2014 by DonS from Oakland, CA
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It will turn make the booker call for heat so just wire the primary circulator off of the boiler. Once a Tstat calls fir heat the secondary pump will start, once boiler starts then the primary pump will as well
      Kristian Wolff
      Wolffsystems

      Answered on 4/14/2014 by Anonymous
  • 3 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    I've had this unit about 6 years, operating two zones in the house. Zone 2 works perfectly. Zone 1 functions correctly when the thermostat calls for heat but there is now an unusual "clicking" noise at the relay unit that continues even as the hot water circulates. There is no clicking heard when zone 2 operates. Both zones accurately heat to thermostat settings. What is wrong and how do I fix it?
    Asked on 1/17/2014 by Cloud

    3 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      If both t-stats are powered by the same 24volt transformer, that rules out the transformer. If each t-stat has its own it's possible that that unit is intermittent, use a digital voltmeter to confirm if voltage is not constant. If voltage is steady, (24~28v). Relay is defective. If you have a spare zone move leads to that zone. Maybe relay can be replaced without replacing the entire unit. Bob.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 1/18/2014 by Bob from Long Island
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Here is a guess:
      Does the red light for zone 1 blink when it clicks?
      1 If so, you might have a problem with the thermostat or the wire.
      Try swapping thermostats - top rule out a thermostat problem
      Try putting a jumper on the Zone 1 thermostat connection- to rule out a faulty wire
      2 If it does not blink you may have an internal problem with the relay - unusual, but possible.
      Try swapping the relay cubes for zone 1 with one of the others.
      Try moving the thermostat wire and the circulator wire to zone 3 if not is unused.
      Has any electrical work been done on or near the heating system?
      I have seen relays click and chatter when they get backfed voltage from another circuit
      This could happen on the low voltage or the line voltage side
      Are the thermostats the same?
      battery powered?

      Answered on 1/18/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Sounds like relay chatter, which is likely one of two things:
      1. The relay is dying - the coil could be losing its mojo. Easiest way
      to investigate is to pull the cover off the unit. The relays are standard
      ice-cube units, you could swap 1 and 2, if the problem moves to 2 then it is
      the relay. You could also swap 1 with 3 (which it sounds like you are not
      using), if the problem goes away you're done. If you haven't worked with
      these relays, they just pull straight out of the base, then get pushed back
      in.
      2. The voltage to the relay coil is falling below the lower limit.
      Assuming you are using the built-in 24V supply and since zone 2 is working
      this would point to a bad connection or a bad thermostat switch. There
      could be just enough resistance that the voltage is right at the lower
      limit. If you are using a separate power supply then you would have to
      start there. Easiest way to test this is to disconnect the thermostat input
      for zone 1 and just connect a jumper directly at the controller. If the
      problem goes away then you know the problem is outside the box. If it
      doesn't go away (and your jumper connections are solid and clean) then the
      problem is inside the controller. See idea 1 above. If it is inside the
      unit you should be able to actually see the relays activate with the cover
      removed, if you see one cycling then you know the problem is with either
      that relay or the wiring to it.

      Answered on 1/17/2014 by DonS from Oakland, CA
  • 1 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    I am getting ready to purchase radiant heat parts for my garage I would like to use a taco 3 speed pump ,tekmar 507 thermostate would this relay operate the pump?
    Asked on 10/17/2013 by needin help from Mars PA

    1 answer

    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      Yes, this relay would interface the thermostat with the pump and the boiler when a call for heat is made.

      Answered on 10/18/2013 by PexSupply Staff from NY
  • 4 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    I have a three zones with Honeywell Zone Valves V8043 E 1012.
    Are they compatable with the taco 4 zone relay
    Asked on 9/5/2012 by hup23 from ohio

    7 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Let me start by saying that I'm not a professional plumber!
      What voltage thermostats do you have? If you have low voltage thermostats they are 24 volt (AC - alternating current). If you have line voltage thermostats, they are 110 volt (AC).
      The SR-504 is generally used with low voltage thermostats to switch on/off a line voltage device, like a circulator. Your zone valves are 24 v. devices. If you have low voltage thermostats, please reference the manual (see link below) for typical wiring instructions.
      http://s3.pexsupply.com/manuals/***.****97/39247_PROD_FILE.pdf
      If you have line voltage thermostats, I'm not sure how to proceed. Good luck.
      Joseph

      Answered on 9/5/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Their 2 types of Taco Relay for 24 v & 120 V you want 24v for zone valve control, And 120v for pumps. with a thermostat in the middle
      for control.

      Answered on 9/5/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      yes

      Answered on 9/6/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It should be but I'm not completely sure

      Answered on 9/6/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The Taco zone relay controller is designed to control a 120v appliance such as a pump. It has provisions to connect a separate thermostat to each zone and control a pump in that loop. If you have three zone valves then you have only one pump in the system and don't require the controller

      Answered on 9/6/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      yes

      Answered on 9/7/2012 by Anonymous
    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      Yes, they are.

      Answered on 9/11/2012 by PexSupply Staff from NY
  • 1 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    I currently have two zones that I am replacing. Can I buy two of these zone relays or is one sufficient? The two zone relay is more expensive than two single zones would it work to use two 1 zone relays?
    Asked on 7/30/2012 by AY from East Brunswick, NJ

    1 answer

    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      It will work if you use two seperate 1-zone relays.

      Answered on 7/31/2012 by PexSupply Staff from NY
  • 3 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    I have this 3 Zone switch and it controls two zones currently, my radiant floor heat in an upper bathroom and then the main zone with radiators in the entire house. I want to add another in floor heat zone that will use the same circulator/mixing valve as the upper bathroom. I was planning to add two zone valve actuators - one on the upper bathroom and one on the new zone (both will be on separate thermostats). Can I do that with this product or will I need something else to control the valve actuators? Does it matter if the valve actuators are 2, 3, or 4 wire?

    As a follow up the circulator for the radiant heat has an actuator on the mixing valve - can this product control that as well?
    Thank you!
    Asked on 7/8/2012 by asnyder80 from St. Paul, MN

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      use taco zvc panel for zone valves, buy the correct panel for number of hot
      zones for radiant needed, also need sr501 for running pump for radiant
      heat circuit

      Answered on 7/8/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi , it sounds like your gonna have a total of 4 zones cause you have 2 and or adding 2 . If thats correct then you will need a controller that can handle 4 zones not three as the sr503. you can add therms to any zone you like with this type controller or the 4 zone ..Just keep in mind that the sr 503 is for zone valves use only depending on what controller you use 3,4,5 zones etc . The SR503 can only control 1 circ pump , I believe you are only using 1 currently which is fine.. Hope this helps.

      Answered on 7/8/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You will need separate control for actuators and then use end switch or
      dry contacts on that control to go to the existing TT where the
      current bath goes now.

      Answered on 7/9/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Try using a zone control module, e.g. Uponor A3030003, into which you can plug your two radiant zones' thermostats. This module (or modules, depending upon how many wires you want to run) has controls for the actuators, and an output which can then be connected to your existing zone switch.
      Oh, and make sure your radiant zone pump can handle the new load.

      Answered on 7/9/2012 by Anonymous
  • 1 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    Where can I get spare fuses for this?
    Asked on 6/27/2012 by Pilotattitude from Long Island, NY

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Radio Shack or Electrical Supply House.......73Bob.

      Answered on 6/27/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Your local hardware store or auto parts shop should carry them.

      Answered on 6/27/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Any automotive parts shop or radio shack will have what you need.
      walter

      Answered on 6/27/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I would bring the fuse to an auto parts store and see if they can match one up for you.
      John White
      Process Engineer

      Answered on 6/27/2012 by Anonymous
  • 1 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    Can this relay be installed in any position or must it be installed upright... Thanks
    Asked on 5/11/2012 by Mondo

    8 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Any Position.

      Answered on 5/11/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It can be installed in any position.

      Answered on 5/11/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      This is an electronic control so it technically can be installed in any
      direction (except that the back must be against the wall). That said,
      it is slightly better to install it in the intended direction so that
      lights are visible and labels are readable.

      Answered on 5/11/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It will function in any position

      Answered on 5/12/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Installing in any position will be fine.

      Answered on 5/12/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Any position is fine.

      Answered on 5/12/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It can be installed in any position.
      Phelps Clarke

      Answered on 5/13/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      you may install in any position as long as you can get cover off

      Answered on 5/14/2012 by Anonymous
  • 3 Zone Switching Relay

    Q:

    I am setting up a 3 zone system (a pump for each zone). It is a closed loop system, so there is a heat exchanger with a separate pump on the domestic side that will provide heat for the radiant side. I will need this 'fourth' pump to loop hot water through the hear exchanger whenever heat is needed. How do I get that 4th pump to come on whenever any of the three zones call for heat? Thanks
    Asked on 5/5/2012 by Homeowner Dan from Indian Hills, CO

    10 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Use a fan center (coil/relay) wired to each zone end switch, you can also
      use transformer to power valves

      Answered on 5/5/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      TT (X X) on the SR-503 control will close a dry contact to run (trigger) an additional relay for the "boiler" circ pump. I recommend using a Taco 501 relay to keep the installation simple.
      Hazard Stewart
      Newport Geothermal, LLC

      Answered on 5/5/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Use an SR 501. Take the TT out from the SR503 to the thermostat input on
      the SR 501. The output from the SR 501 can power the fourth pump and
      turn on a boiler.

      Answered on 5/5/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Have you looked at the Taco Zone Control Modules (e.g. ZVC403-2)? These normally are used to control zone valves, but can also be wired to drive a switching relay. The modules contain their own relays to control the 'boiler' pump, which is the 4th pump in your scenario.

      Answered on 5/5/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I'm not 100% sure what you are doing, but it sounds like you are using a domestic hot water heater to heat an in-floor (radiant) system. If you are using the pump controller shown in the picture below, there should be an output to turn the boiler on. Just wire your 4th pump up like it were the boiler.
      John White
      Process Engineer | Pioneer Surgical

      Answered on 5/7/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      When any of the zones calls for heat, the "solated end switch (X1 and X2) will start the boiler" - that is, the wires from X1 and X2 go to the "TT" on the Aquastat controller to turn on the boiler. You may be able to run wires in parallel from X1 and X2 to your 4th pump so it also goes on when any of the zones go on. (Caveat - I am a DIYer!)

      Answered on 5/7/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      There is a relay contact that is enegized whenever any of the zones are activated. This set of relay contacts can be used to power the pump that puts hot water into the heat exchanger.

      Answered on 5/7/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Do you have a relay for the 4th pump? You will need it for the radiant side. You can have this setup to turn on when the other switch on the main heat unit.

      Answered on 5/7/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      If you are using a taco or smiler relay us the "TT" thermals and hook up a
      24 volt coil relay to fire the heat exchanger pump. I like the MacDuffco
      MDR2400 (SPDT) relay in this application.

      Answered on 5/8/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      there are many ways you could do this and it will really depend on your
      design. You can have a temperature sensor, you could have a flow sensor or
      you could have your heater control that last pump. I do not have this
      design in my house but I would first try to define what you want the
      heat exchange loop to monitor. I tend to stay away from heat exchanges as
      they are inefficient and there is probably simpler way to design.

      Answered on 5/9/2012 by Another PexSupply Customer
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