3/8" AQUAPEX White (400 ft. coil) Zoom

3/8" AQUAPEX White (400 ft. coil)

SKU:F1090375

Brand: Uponor (Wirsbo)

Uponor (Wirsbo)
Qty Price
$139.95
/ each
$404.85 / box (3 units x $134.95)
In Stock! Ships in 24-48 Hours
(4 Available)
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Resources

Specs

Size: 3/8"
Color: White
Length (Feet): 400'
Outside Diameter: 0.5"
Inside Diameter: 0.35"
Fitting System Compatibility: Crimp/Clamp (HydroPEX)
Expander (ProPEX)
PEX Compression
Press (Viega)
Push Fit (Sharkbite)
Tubing Type: Non-Oxygen Barrier
Material: PEX
Application: Heating
Plumbing
Max Pressure (PSI): 160 psi
Grade:
?
PEX-a
Warranty: 25 Year
Standards Met: DIN4726
ASTM F877
NSF
Max Temp (F): 200°F

Description for Uponor (Wirsbo) F1090375

AQUAPEX tubing is used primarily in hot and cold potable water distribution systems and Wirsbo AQUASAFE fire sprinkler systems. AQUAPEX tubing is used in hydronic heating applications where the system contains no ferrous corrodible components or where any ferrous components are isolated from tubing. AQUAPEX tubing is not manufactured with an oxygen diffusion barrier. AQUAPEX tubing coils and straight lengths are available in natural, red and blue.

AQUAPEX is manufactured and listed to ASTM F876 and F877 and certified to NSF Standards 14 and 61. AQUAPEX tubing is rated and listed by the Hydrostatic Stress Board of PPI at 200 degrees F at 80 psi, 180 degrees F at 100 psi and 73.4 degrees F at 160 psi.

Note: Wirsbo 1/2" AQUAPEX tubing is listed to UL1821 and ULC/ORD C199 P and carries an additional rating of 120 degrees F at 130 psi.

What are the Uponor PEX standards?
Uponor PEX and associated fittings are manufactured to the following standards:

  • ASTM F876 "Standard Specification for Cross-linked Polyethylene (PEX) Tubing"
  • ASTM F877 "Standard Specification for Cross-linked Polyethylene (PEX) Plastic Hot and Cold Water Distribution Systems"
  • ASTM F1960 "Standard Specifications for Cold Expansion Fittings with PEX Reinforcing Rings for use with Cross-linked Polyethylene (PEX) Tubing"
  • ASTM F2080 "Standard Specifications for Cold Expansion Fittings with Metal Compression Sleeves for Cross-linked Polyethylene (PEX) Tubing"
  • CSA B137.5 Thermoplastic Pressure Piping Compendium
Additional standards for Uponor AquaPEX tubing and associated fittings include:
  • ANSI/NSF Standard 14 "Plastics Piping System Components and Related Materials"
  • ANSI/NSF Standard 61 "Drinking Water System Components - Health Effects"
  • UL 1821 "Standard for Safety for Thermoplastic Sprinkler Pipe and Fittings for Fire Protection Service" (1/2" Uponor AquaPEX only)
What code approvals does Uponor AquaPEX tubing have?
Uponor AquaPEX tubing is approved in the following codes:
  • IPC
  • UPC
  • NSP
  • IMC
  • UMC
  • NSPC
  • NPC of Canada
  • NBC of Canada
What listings does Uponor AquaPEX tubing have?
Uponor AquaPEX tubing has the following listings:
  • IAPMO
  • NSF
  • CSA
  • ITS
  • HUD
  • ICC
What fire-rated assemblies does Uponor AquaPEX tubing have?
  • G573 - Two-hour Hambro floor/ceiling assembly
  • K913 - Two-hour concrete floor/ceiling assembly
  • L557 - One-hour wood frame floor/ceiling assembly
  • U372 - One-hour wood frame wall assembly
  • V444 - One-hour steel stud wall assembly

3/8" AQUAPEX White (400 ft. coil)

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Uponor (Wirsbo)3" AQUAPEX White - (350 ft. coil)
 
4.9

(based on 172 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (163)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (6)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (1)

98%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Most Liked Positive Review

 

I would use this in my next house

we used this in our floor of a dubble wide.With no connection under floor.The tubeing is graet for goning around object inthe floor or walls.It does not bend well in the cold .

we used this in our floor of a dubble wide.With no connection under floor.The tubeing is graet for goning around object inthe floor or walls.It does not bend well in the cold .

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

shipping wrap

This product is very good with one exception,
The plastic wrap that is designed to use from
the inside works great until the last two wraps,
at this time it is...Read complete review

This product is very good with one exception,
The plastic wrap that is designed to use from
the inside works great until the last two wraps,
at this time it is cheaper to throw away the last two coils than to try to get it out of the plastic
The time it takes to free the pipe from the wrap
totally wipes out any savings from the product.

Reviewed by 172 customers

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5.0

Aquapex is the Best...

By THendricks

from Florida

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1/2" AQUAPEX Blue - (300 ft. coil):

This is some of the best PEX tubing on the market. I am sure there are other manufactures that have a great similar product, even though you pay a little more for the Aquapex and other top brands, it is well worth it. This tubing has great flexibility, much more than the stuff you see at the Big Box stores. Very pleased with the PEX-A Aquapex.

 
5.0

Easy to work with.

By Tom

from Hendersonville TN

Verified Buyer

Comments about 3/4" AQUAPEX White - (100 ft. coil):

Replacing 50 year old copper. The existing copper has developed numerous leaks and many of the joints are not assessable for soldering. The Aquapex makes running new lines so much easier.

 
5.0

Great reliable product

By Ovidiu

from Dublin , ca

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1/2" AQUAPEX White - (300 ft. coil):

Great product especially for remodel cases , much more flexible than other types of pex( class b or c) , fail proof system , never had a leak

 
5.0

great product

By chris

from Indiana

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1/2" AQUAPEX Red - (300 ft. coil):

Did my house using AquaPex and was very happy with the results.

 
5.0

Wirsbo 3/4 inch blue tubimg

By Mike the plumber

from Needles, California

Verified Buyer

Comments about 3/4" AQUAPEX Blue - (100 ft. coil):

The memory, as it quickly returns to its original shape to make the connections.

 
5.0

Very easy to work with.

By Pawl J.

from Nazareth, PA

Verified Buyer

Comments about 3/4" AQUAPEX White - (100 ft. coil):

This was my first PEX and it was easy. Very bendable, no kinking, easy to cut. I can only compare with the hard 3/4 inch I removed, which was stiff and hard. Not sure if this was from age, but I don't want stiff PEX, I want stuff I can easily bend 90 degree angles and slip a metal sleeve over.

 
5.0

Great!!

By mythosrose

from Washingtion St.

Verified Buyer

Comments about 3/4" AQUAPEX Blue - (100 ft. coil):

Great pipe!! Omg its nice to work with!!

 
5.0

Uponor is the best tubing!

By walleyeman

from Sturgis, SD

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1/2" AQUAPEX White - (100 ft. coil):

Uponor is the best tubing Iv'e worked with yet, easy to install fitting , no leaks ever! and very light and easy to handel !

 
5.0

Don't waste your time with others

By The German

from Yorktown , VA

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1/2" AQUAPEX Blue - (100 ft. coil):

Didn't know that their is a difference with Pex but after some drips from the L
Big box stores products I tried the aqua Pex from here. Found out the other Pex must not be the same because I haven't had any more drips! Plus when I ordered the pipe it was at my jobs within a day or so even that I work from New York to Miami . Only good to say I have been ordering from here for years NEVER been let down by products or service !!!

 
5.0

Excellent product

By Doug

from Salem Ky.

Verified Buyer

Comments about 1/2" AQUAPEX Blue - (100 ft. coil):

Use this product for repairs and new construction plumbing work

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Q&A: Ask the Questions, share answers

Do you have questions about this product?

get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

95 Questions | 309 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • 3" AQUAPEX White - (350 ft. coil)

    Q:

    Will chlorinated water do damage to the interior composition of the pipe
    Asked on 10/8/2014 by Al from United States

    1 answer

    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      Yes, the PEX tubing will suffer oxidation damage. Chlorinated water should not be used in the AQUAPEX tubing.

      Answered on 10/16/2014 by SupplyHouse Staff from NY
  • 3/4" AQUAPEX White - (100 ft. coil)

    Q:

    Does the AQUAPEX white (clear) coil have the same quality with blue or red? and is the "grade A" lead free? does it qualify California code?
    Asked on 7/22/2014 by JC from San Diego CA

    6 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      1) All AquaPEX is the same quality regardless of color. The blue and red are optional colors added to clear AquaPEX during manufacturing to make it easy for the plumber to differentiate between hot and cold while plumbing a building. Color-blind plumbers should just use clear for everything ;)
      2) All AquaPEX is absolutely lead free. It is the best tubing for drinking water ever devised by man. Far better than copper, PVC or CPVC.
      3) All AquaPEX meets all California codes that I am familiar with. It might not meet code if you were to use it for something like Fire Protection. But for potable water/pressure applications, it meets every code.
      Ken Morley

      Answered on 7/25/2014 by KMorley from Tampa, Florida
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      dont live in calif and do not know the codes. all colors i think are the
      same.
      Garland Sonsel

      Answered on 7/24/2014 by Old Man from Port Lavaca Tx
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The white AquaPex tubing should be the same quality as the red and blue. The oolor is used to help keep hot and cold water lines separate so there won't be any mixing of these lines. The white can be used for any system even hot and cold water lines. Contact the manufacturer about "grade A" and if it meets California code.
      Doug

      Answered on 7/23/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The white AquaPex tubing should be the same quality as the red and blue. The oolor is used to help keep hot and cold water lines separate so there won't be any mixing of these lines. The white can be used for any system even hot and cold water lines. Contact the manufacturer about "grade A" and if it meets California code.
      Doug

      Answered on 7/23/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Color should not matter for quality ratings. In my plumbing project, I used red for hot, blue for cold, and white for drinking water that bypassed the water softener. AFAIK, there's no lead in any of this - piping or fittings. None of it is metal. Well the fittings are copper but other than that nothing is metal. I live in Minnesota so I don't know about California code. But I don't see why it would be a problem. Your local building inspector is probably the best source for the code question.

      Answered on 7/22/2014 by Greg Scott from Minnesota
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Uponor tubing have same quality, colored tubing used where necessary, blue for cold water red for hot water‎. AquaPEX is crosslinked polyethylene (plastic) there is no metal in the tubing. This is one of the best quality product for potable water. No one made better crosslinked polyethylene then Uponor die to unique manufacturing process. In regards of CA law I cannot help You.
      Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Rogers network.

      Answered on 7/22/2014 by Anonymous
  • 1-1/4" AQUAPEX White - (300 ft. coil)

    Q:

    Can this product be used outdoors to feed water supply to a cabin from a fresh water spring?
    Asked on 7/11/2014 by Jack of all trades from Shippensburg PA

    7 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It could be, but it is suspetable to UV from the sun.
      Garland Sonsel

      Answered on 7/11/2014 by Old Man from Port Lavaca Tx
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      This product can be used outdoor in above freezing temperature with UV light protection ‎or in ground . Compression fittings available from Uponor. List expensive tubing You can use is 75psi rating polyethylene with red line
      Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Rogers network.

      Answered on 7/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      PEX cannot be exposed to UV, so it needs to be buried or completely covered.
      As long as it is not exposed to the sun, it is fine.

      Answered on 7/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      yes, but it can freeze if exposed to below freezing temperatures.  That won't hurt the aquapex but could damage the fittings that are not able to expand from freezing water. Buried is no problem though. 

      Answered on 7/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes, this product can be used outdoors as long as it is protected from UV (sunlight) and is at least minimally protected from freezing.
      If buried, it should be in a sand bed to prevent sharp objects from wearing a hole in the buing. The tubing will tolerate occasional freezing and thawing, but should be insulated and buried deeply enough that freezing will not become a regular occurrence.
      Exposure to UV will seriously degrade tubing strength. The tubing should not be exposed to UV other than during installation (no more than 30 days) and the ends above ground should transition to PVC, copper or some other material.

      Answered on 7/11/2014 by KMorley from Tampa, Florida
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Should be ok. But remember this is photo sensitive so it would need to be screened.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 7/11/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Pex degrades when exposed to sunlight. It should be sleeved when used
      underground (according to Wikipedia, which also states it is vulnerable to
      certain plant eating insects).

      Answered on 7/11/2014 by Anonymous
  • 1/2" AQUAPEX Blue - (100 ft. coil)

    Q:

    Is aquapex (expansion ring type) suitable for direct burial or does it need to be protected with a sleeve, rap, or cover of some kind.
    Should it be placed in a bed of sand and then covered over.
    Asked on 7/1/2014 by Alan C. from Reno, NV

    6 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      PEX tubing is approved for direct burial outdoors, a practice most often
      necessary when running a water supply line to a house. PEX, since it can
      expand, resists freezing more effectively than rigid pipe, but PEX can
      still burst if water freezes in a line. As a result, it’s a must to bury
      the tubing below the frost line. The depth of the frost line in a given
      area can be obtained by contacting the municipality or local water
      company. *Although
      an unbroken line of PEX would be ideal, dezincification-resistant brass PEX
      fittings or plastic PEX fittings should be used in areas known to have
      aggressive water or soil when a fitting is necessary. Stainless steel clamp
      rings are a better choice than copper crimp rings due to their increased
      corrosion resistance.*
      Residential water supply lines generally use 3/4” pipe (occasionally 1”).
      SupplyHouse <http://www.supplyhouse.com/> carries PEX-B tubing
      <http://www.supplyhouse.com/PEX-Tubing-516000> in these sizes, as well as
      PEX-A rated AquaPEX <http://www.supplyhouse.com/AquaPEX-Tubing-517000>
      and pre-insulated
      AquaPEX <http://www.supplyhouse.com/Pre-Insulated-AquaPEX-Tubing-11448000>.
      Sleeving the buried PEX (in PVC, for example) shields the tubing and can
      make potential repairs easier. Embedding PEX in sand protects it from any
      rocks in the soil. Always check with all applicable local codes prior to
      installation. (from pex supply web site

      Answered on 7/2/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Shoud sleeve it. If you need to go a ways should ck something different.

      Answered on 7/2/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Rarely use Propex rings underground. Red stripe polyethylene tubing with stainless steel clamps will do at lower cost. If use Propex underground composite fitting ( not brass) my first choice, clay or sand without stone around tubing, brass compression adapters for different brand, types of tubing or pipes, electric PVC elbow when tubing go from horizontal to vertical, same PVC to protect from concrete and metal. For connections in the concrete slab band tubing down under concrete, connect and band up in to the slab. For outdoor boiler I use Uponor insulated tubing (very expensive but excellent quality). In general don't run any tubing too close to freezing zone and lay down tubing in curved not straight line ( any plastic expand and retract with pressure difference)Thanks

      Answered on 7/2/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      depends on soil type and what you are doing on surface, i would not drive
      over it. Any thing less than gravel should be ok. If you are getting
      inspection I would call and ask

      Answered on 7/2/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      AquaPex can be buried directly in a bed of sand. It must not be exposed to sunlight, so you have to transition to some other material where it enters the ground if outside. While AquaPex is not adversely affected by freezing once or twice, it could degrade if frozen and thawed repeatedly. There are versions of AquaPex that are pre-insulated with foam that can solve the freezing problem (if buried deep enough) and don't require the sand bed.

      Answered on 7/2/2014 by KMorley from Tampa, Florida
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It really shouldn't matter what connection system you at using - you shouldn't be covering any joints as they are the most likely point to develop issues.
      I have seen direct bury done both ways - with a shroud and without. If you live in area with ground shift you will need a shroud otherwise it is somewhat optional- you are just running the risk of shorting the usable life of the pex.

      Answered on 7/2/2014 by Anonymous
  • 1/2" AQUAPEX Red - (100 ft. coil)

    Q:

    Are those AQUAPEX tubing made in China? if not, where?
    Asked on 6/20/2014 by JC from San Diego

    5 answers

    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      The AquaPEX tubing that is sold in the United States is made at Uponor's factory in Minnesota.

      Answered on 6/23/2014 by SupplyHouse Staff from NY
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      probably not, but I don't know for sure. Most thermoplastic tubing is made
      in the US.
      Garland Sonsel

      Answered on 6/21/2014 by Old Man from Port Lavaca Tx
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      JC:
      You did not indicate where you would be purchasing tubing, so this answer assumes that you would purchase somewhere in North America.
      According to the Uponor web site, AquaPEX tubing sold in North America is manufactured in the United States. They may have other manufacturing facilities around the world devoted to those markets. I know that AquaPex is very popular in rapidly developing countries and so I would not be surprised to find that Uponor also has factories in China, India, etc. for those markets.
      But if you purchase in North America, your product will be manufactured in the US.
      I can't say enough good things about AquaPex. I will never go back to copper or CPVC piping systems.
      Ken Morley

      Answered on 6/21/2014 by KMorley from Tampa, Florida
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Uponor based in Europe , Finland. 10 factories in five countries :Finland, Sweden, Germany, Spain and United States.
      Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Rogers network.

      Answered on 6/20/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      US and Canada

      Answered on 6/20/2014 by Anonymous
  • 1/2" AQUAPEX Red - (100 ft. coil)

    Q:

    Is it true you can use a heat gun to remove the tubing from a fixture to make corrections or repairs? If so how many times can the tubing be heated and reused?
    Asked on 5/29/2014 by Wayne from Bloomington, Mn

    3 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      http://www.uponor-usa.com/~/media/Files/Technical%20Documents/Plumbing%20resources/ProPlumbingInstallGuide_10_07.aspx?sc_lang=en
      Here is the installation guide for aquapex on link above brass fitting can
      be reused with heat gun still need to cut pipe back about 2 inches of pipe
      before making new connections. page 22 of install guide explain's how do
      this correctly.

      Answered on 6/18/2014 by Anonymous
    • CUSTOMER CARE

      A:

      A heat gun can be used to remove and reuse brass ProPEX fittings (see information at the link below for more information). The portion of tubing that was used around the original fittings should not be reused. New connections should be made with fresh tubing that was part of a square cut at least two inches from the end of the existing pipe.

      http://blog.supplyhouse.com/propex-fitting-removal/

      Answered on 5/30/2014 by SupplyHouse Staff from NY
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      While you might technically be able to do this - I wouldn't suggest it. Heatingbthentubing beyond spec levels, which you would have to in thus case, would compromise the integrity of the tubing. In would suggest that you run the install with a little slack to account for these future needs. If you are out of slack it would be cleaner to do a clean cut, add in a connector and extension and attach there.
      Sent from Samsung Mobile

      Answered on 5/29/2014 by Anonymous
  • 3" AQUAPEX White - (100 ft. coil)

    Q:

    We have an industry which is using black pipe for potoble water supply now. The piipe is rusted and we need to repalce this pipe, The temperature will be approximatley 125 deg. ambient with city supply water probably about 80 deg. can we use this pipe in the place of a galvinized pipe and expect the same life and durability of the galvinized.
    Asked on 4/7/2014 by allen sr from kosciusko, ms

    9 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes you can and it will out last any metal pipe including copper or brass. Just remember you will have to support it (clamp or strap it) in very short intervals (about every 12"). We have used it for the same application and any place it may rub or wear we placed insulation on it.
      Great product
      Good Luck

      Answered on 4/8/2014 by The Helper from Mid NY State
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I think this is the best pipe you can buy. When you use the proper fittings
      and the pipe is protected from damage the pipe should last indefinitely.

      Answered on 4/8/2014 by Normie from Montgomery County Pa
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Aquapex has been trouble free. Would use again.
      Charlie

      Answered on 4/8/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      There are several replies to that. Is the pipe going to lay in direct
      sunlight? If not the answer is probably yes, if it is in direct sunlight
      no. Direct sunlight requires black to reduce cracking.
      You also did not state the pressure that it would see.
      I hope this was helpful.

      Answered on 4/7/2014 by Old Man from Port Lavaca Tx
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The Uponor main North America office is in Apple Valley, MN. I would call them on that. I know that many commercial buildings use Uponor Pex instead of copper these days. My gut says it should be fine, but I would ask the manufacturer this question.
      - Greg
      Greg Scott
      Infrasupport Corporation

      Answered on 4/7/2014 by Greg Scott from Minnesota
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      This tubing will survive longer then galvanized pipe. Clean water, no additives. Tubing installation required proper fitting and I recommend UV light protection (sunlight, metal halide bulbs,sodium bulbs, mercury bulbs). Please follow local building code, this tubing will melt in event of fire without proper protection. For 20 years I never see AquaPEX fail. On longer distance I use. Polyethylene tubing (black poly tubing) with proper pressure rating - lower price alternative. Thanks.

      Answered on 4/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes. The pex should last longer than any iron or copper system.
      Thank You,
      Daniel F. Walker
      e: <mailto:****@***.***> ****@***.***

      Answered on 4/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You didn't specify the size of your existing black steel pipe, if it is in
      the current Aquapex available sizes, I would recommend replacing with
      Aquapex, so easy to work with. Steel galvanized pipes will build-up
      sediments inside, thus reducing the inside diameter and therefore the flown
      of water, and eventually will rust.
      Talk to the people at Pex Supply, they will guide you through the process
      from A to Z.
      Good luck.
      Gilbert.

      Answered on 4/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      My experience with the Uponor pex is very positive. Here in the North Carolina mountains, copper tubing is rapidly degraded due to the chemical make-up of the well water. The same
      goes for steel pipe. The choices have been CPVC and pex. I was attracted to the Uponor system because of the nature of the compression fittings... there are no metal compression
      rings that will eventually leak. The formula for the pipe requires it to be continually contracting and renewing the grip on the fitting. It may be something of a pain to make the
      joint, but you are assured of a leak free joint if it is done property. As to the material, it is a plastic that does nothing... there is no chemical or galvanic action. The
      temperatures that you suggest, in my experience, are not a problem. For your peace of mind, you can contact the manufacturer for their cut sheet that will give you the parameters
      under which the pipe has been designed to work. Personally, I'd never go back to the old copper tubing style I used for forty years.

      Answered on 4/7/2014 by Smokey from NC mountains
  • 1/2" AQUAPEX Red - (100 ft. coil)

    Q:

    I am going to be replacing an exsisting shower/tub 1 handle fixture. I was planning on adapting from the copper lines to pex-a to the fixture. Which fitting do you recommend for this application.
    Asked on 3/16/2014 by rmturner54 from Texas

    12 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I did this by sweating a ½ inch pipe thread into the copper and connecting what amounts to a pex compression union onto this and from there it is all pex fittings. There are other compression fittings for copper tubing that do not require soldering the and one of these could be used as an alternative.

      Answered on 3/24/2014 by Charlie from Harmony (Laramie) Wyoming
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Your fixture likely has a threaded connection, in which you'll either need
      a male or female adapter. In almost all cases it'll be a male adapter.
      male: (LF4525050)
      http://www.pexsupply.com/Wirsbo-Uponor-LF4525050-ProPEX-LF-Brass-Male-Threaded-Adapter-1-2-PEX-x-1-2-NPT
      female: (LF4575050)
      http://www.pexsupply.com/Wirsbo-Uponor-LF4575050-ProPEX-LF-Brass-Female-Threaded-Adapter-1-2-PEX-x-1-2-NPT
      Now, if you have a straight piece of copper pipe you're trying to tie into,
      you'll need a adapter you can sweat to the pipe. Something similar to the
      following:
      (LF4515050)
      http://www.pexsupply.com/Wirsbo-Uponor-LF4515050-ProPEX-LF-Brass-Sweat-Adapter-1-2-PEX-x-1-2-Copper

      Answered on 3/19/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I believe the copper sweat to pex fitting would be your easiest method. I
      have used them in the past with good results.

      Answered on 3/18/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      they have propex copper pipe adapter fittings that work great.  I have also used the sharkbite fitting without any problems.
      http://www.pexsupply.com/ProPEX-Expander-Fittings-526000

      Answered on 3/17/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You need a street copper to pex fitting, that should slide right into your
      new valve.

      Answered on 3/17/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It is Your choice ‎. Any PEX fitting will lower amount of water to shower valve. If Your valve rated for 2.2GPM any upproved PEX fittings will work fine. I use upproved copper and Propex for 15+ years without complain. Thanks

      Answered on 3/16/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I recommend the propex fittings. They need an expensive expansion tool. If
      you know how to solder, it'll be much cheaper to use copper pipe and
      fittings. If it is a short distance I would use copper . The new tub shower
      fixture probably has solder ports anyway.

      Answered on 3/16/2014 by Normie from Montgomery County Pa
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Take a pex shower/tub rough in. Sweat a female to pex adapter on the hot and cold water supply.

      Answered on 3/16/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I am not positive which way Pex would do it, I would probably sweat a
      copper fitting with a female npt thread to the copper and then use a male
      npt to Pex tube. Lowes carries an assortment of pex fittings that you can
      look at.
      I hope this was helpful.

      Answered on 3/16/2014 by Old Man from Port Lavaca Tx
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Pex Supply has a full spectrum of PEX to NPT adaptors, straight or 90. I
      suggest you go to their Web side and select the one most appropriate for
      your project.
      Good luck.
      Gilbert.

      Answered on 3/16/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I would use the Uponor fittings that match with the tubing.
      Greg Scott
      Infrasupport Corporation

      Answered on 3/16/2014 by Greg Scott from Minnesota
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Since it is Pex-A you can use the propex expander method, brass crush rings, or stainless steel crimp rings. Unless you are going to install a lot then I would recommend the stainless steel rings. 1 inexpensive tool will work on most common sizes and you can buy them at the Big Box stores now if you run out. I used the stainless rings and the expander method in my house. I use the stainless ones now due to ease of tool and ease of getting more rings local as needed. I could not find any places that carried the expander method parts. But I still use Pex-A as we do get colder temps from time to time.

      Answered on 3/16/2014 by Anonymous
  • 1" AQUAPEX White - (100 ft. coil)

    Q:

    Can I use to replace my black plastic under ground well pipe. Do I need the barrier type? The present pipe started to leak ( I think it froze) Plan to replace in the spring. The black plastic is running from the detached garage storage tank to the home. The water goes from the well to the garage then to the home.
    Asked on 2/6/2014 by Bill from New Castle, P:A

    9 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I used Aquapex for potable water and it worked fine however I would not recommend that it be placed where it can freeze - repeated freeze thaw cycles will weaken the Aquapex and it will also start to leak. I have no experience using Aquapex with a heat tape but that might be a way to prevent further damage?

      Answered on 2/11/2014 by Charlie from Harmony (Laramie) Wyoming
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes. you don't barrier [for heating only]

      Answered on 2/8/2014 by Normie from Montgomery County Pa
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      According to Uponor's installation manual, AQUAPEX is rated for underground
      water service. See the attached manual (pages 26-27) and follow the
      installation instructions. If the manual isn't attached, I've included
      instructions from the manual below (but the pictures won't come through).
      You can also download from Uponor's site or the following link (
      http://www.uponorpro.com/~/media/Extranet/Files/plumbing%20literature/PLU_InsG_P731_0213.aspx?sc_lang=en&version=0***.****2).
      You also need to follow your local building code. At a minimum, bury the
      line below your local frost depth or whatever is required by your building
      code, whichever is more stringent. Some other ideas to consider are:
      - Burying the tubing in a shallow layer of sand to avoid rocks puncturing
      the pipe.
      - Some people like to install may recommend installing the tubing through a
      larger PVC conduit, but this may conflict with Uponor's instructions to
      "snake" the tubing.
      - After layering a couple inches of sand or fine dirt over the tubing, you
      could put a 2x board over the top which will help avoid shovels from
      puncturing the line if anyone decides to dig in that area in the future.
      Water Service Phase
      Uponor AquaPEX tubing meets the requirements of the following standard:
      • ANSI/AWWA Standard C904-06, Crosslinked Polyethylene (PEX) 1⁄2 inch
      (12mm) through 3 inches (76mm) for Water Service
      Please refer to the ANSI/AWWA Standard for information regarding the
      selection, use and proper application of PEX tubing in water service.
      Handling and Repairs
      Although Uponor AquaPEX tubing is highly resistant to kinking and abrasion,
      it is important to handle with care while installing the tubing to prevent
      damage and possible failure. If damage occurs during installation, cut out
      and repair the area before backfilling. To reform kinked tubing, refer to
      Section 2: Reforming Kinked Uponor AquaPEX Tubing on page 9. If damaged
      beyond the thermal memory capacity of the tubing, use a ProPEX repair
      coupling that is suitable for direct burial. Note: Do not reuse or reclaim
      EP fittings.
      Trench Bottom
      Preparation
      For a successful installation, the supporting soil must provide a stable
      and continuous support for the tubing.
      Good Soil Conditions
      If the trench cut is relatively smooth, install the tubing directly on the
      prepared bottom. The bottom must be flat with no hollows, lumps or rocks.
      Bad Soil Conditions
      If installing in rocky, clay, muddy or other poor soil conditions, it may
      be necessary to prepare the trench bottom using granular material of such
      size and grading to provide a stable base. See your local code for
      additional requirements.
      Installation
      Install Uponor AquaPEX tubing underground in a manner that avoids damage
      caused by external loads. External loads should not cause a decrease in the
      vertical dimension of the tubing cross-section more than 5% of the outside
      diameter. To ensure proper underground installation:
      • Install Uponor AquaPEX tubing in a snaking pattern with sufficient slack
      in the line to allow for contraction of the line due to temperature change
      prior to backfilling.
      • The linear expansion rate for Uponor AquaPEX tubing is approximately 1.1"
      per 10°F (5.6°C) temperature change for every 100' of tubing.
      • Do not use blocking to support the tubing or change the tubing grade.
      • Do not install potable water service tubing in, under or above cesspools,
      septic tanks, septic tank drainage fields or pits.

      Answered on 2/8/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The standard Uponor Aquapex will do fine as a water supply line. The beauty of pex is that it can freeze and thaw without structural damage... that is the pipe, not fitting
      connections. Pex cannot be exposed to sunlight, so be prepared to shield all pex from the sun, and bury it deep enough to be below the frost line and where it is not subject to
      physical damage. Any time a plastic pipe is buried in the ground, a metallic tracer should be buried with it as a locator. Since you are not using this product for under slab
      heating, the barrier type pipe is not necessary... it does very fine as a water supply pipe.

      Answered on 2/7/2014 by Smokey from NC mountains
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      pex would be a good choice the barrier. type is not necessary that is for heating systems
      Sent from my U.S. Cellular® smartphone

      Answered on 2/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I'll bet Uponor has a customer service line that could help answer that question. When I did my project, it was all for indoor plumbing and didn't look at any in-ground or in-floor stuff. I live close to Uponor's US headquarters and I drove over there and walked around the campus like I owned the place. I ended up talking to a gentleman in his office and he gave me a great demo. So I'm an Uponor fan.
      http://www.uponor-usa.com/
      - Greg
      Greg Scott
      Infrasupport Corporation

      Answered on 2/6/2014 by Greg Scott from Minnesota
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I am not the best person to ask for that application. As far as I am aware the pec is susceptible to bursting under freezing conditions, but please verify.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 2/6/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You can replace the black pipe with PEX pipe underground without any protection. I would recommend bearing it deeper so that you don't freeze in cold weather. The good thing about pecks pipe is if it does freeze it won't rupture like your black pipe did. It depends on what part of the country you're from but you might have to bury a pipe's deepest green beans and some of the northern regions.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 2/6/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The PEX would be preferable to the poly pipe.  You need to ensure that the PEX is not exposed to UV over time.

      Answered on 2/6/2014 by Anonymous
  • 3/4" AQUAPEX White - (100 ft. coil)

    Q:

    CaN pex be used under a house without freezing?, also it will be out of direct sunlight if that helps answer the question. Which product would be the best?. I don't me installing in a slab.
    Asked on 1/6/2014 by Anonymous from Ackerman, MS

    10 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      PEX pipe will freeze! It is however almost impossible the rupture. So after thaw your water will flow.
      PEX pipe does not like sun light! You must protect the pipe from sun light or it will deteriorate.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I imagine the factors around freezing non-pex piping is the same for pex
      piping. Some form of insulation would be needed to keep any pipe from
      freezing, including pex.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      If you are going to pour a slab foundation, Pex is fine below the slab. It
      sounds as if you are in cold country and I ami in S Texas.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Old Man from Port Lavaca Tx
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I'd check the international residential building code. I remember seeing
      particular specs for burying pipe. After that, check to see if your locality
      has additional codes that apply. Typically, I've seen pex routed through
      attics. Not sure if I get your question, but if you're going to pour "hot"
      concrete, the pH is going to be through the rough until it cures (very
      alkaline). Not sure if pex is designed to withstand that kind of extreme pH.
      Most of the CPVC and copper I've seem come through the slab of new
      construction has a blue or red vinyl sheath around it, probably as a
      chemical and mechanical barrier between the pipe and concrete.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Like anything it needs to be insulated. Left bare, it will freeze. Pex can
      expand when frozen and goes back to its original shape without bursting.
      Fittings on the other hand may break. I am not sure what your statement of I
      don't me installing in slab means. I have radiant pex tubing in my slab and
      it works great. You need to use a HEPex, not aquapex for it. to make best
      use of it and be most efficient, you should install at a minimum of 2 inches
      of blue insulation, not pink, and not polyisuanurate. Blue works best and
      won't crush/fatigue over time. You should attache the pex to the metal mesh
      using metal ties. No run should be more than 300 feet max. a also recommend
      buying guides to ensure the tubing come up from the slab perfectly straight
      for tying into the system. They also make insultarps for going under it all.
      The biggest take away is that you want the heat to go up, not into the
      ground. The more you can insulate underneath, the better your heat will
      perform.
      Hope that helps.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by FredRuckel from New York
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      To begin, read the manufacturer's instructions for installation. They will cover all the locations where it can be installed. From what you've described, you are intending to run
      lines beneath a house. If the floor is a raised floor (under floor joists), as long as you support the tubing adequately and don't have any fittings or joints in a run, the pex
      should work just fine. Make up you joints in a heated area. From what I've read, the Uponor pex can freeze solid and return to its original shape... I don't know about other brands
      or types. As mentioned above, this is providing that there are no joints in the area subject to freezing. I know that they regularly run pex in slabs for radiant heat, but I would
      locate the pex buried under the concrete if I were using it for water supply... use a sleeve when coming through the slab. As with the under raised floor installation, don't have
      any joints beneath the concrete and place the pex in clear sand (no rocks or big pebbles) buried beneath the slab.
      Hope this helps... I personally like the Uponor product and haven't had any problems. Also,remember you will need an expansion tool specifically designed for the product to
      fabricate the joints... buy one or work out a long term sharing arrangement in case you need to do repairs.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Smokey from NC mountains
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I don't see how. Pex transfers heat or cold to the water. I do not have
      personal experience with the cold as all of my plumbing is inside, but where
      the cold water lines cross over and are laying on the forced air ducts, they
      pick up the heat from the ducts. I plan on putting some Styrofoam sheets
      between the Pex and the ducts, but it is not an urgent task for me.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It can be installed under a house where the temperature is above
      freezing. As you mentioned, out of direct sunlight.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Any water pipe should always be on the warm side of a house to prevent
      freezing. The water will freeze in PEX just like it would in copper. Most
      likely the pipe won't burst like a copper pipe would, but it's not worth
      the risk. If it's outside such as under a crawl space the pipe should be
      drained for winter or freezing temperatures.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I don't think I quite under stand " under a house"
      You can use oxygen barrier pex in a slab .must be in center of concrete pour.
      You must insulate under the slab and above the base of item 4 compacted.
      Also it needs to designed with some care. You can't just put one continuous loop.
      You need to put in sub loops with manifolds . Not exceeding '300 per sub loop.
      Tempered water during operation depending on design. Roughly 120°f supply with a 20° dif.
      This is not something to try for a DIY with out guidance.
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by bobo from ny
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